12 Books That Changed My Life

by Ryan M. Healy on March 25, 2008

I love to read.

And I love to track every book I read.

In fact, I began logging every book I finished starting in the 8th grade, and I’ve been doing it ever since. Every January, I close out the prior year, print my log, hole-punch it, and put it in my book log binder.

It’s nothing fancy, really. Just the book title, author, a few sentences about the book (including what I did or didn’t like), and a rating.

Since 1993, I’ve finished reading 405 books. So a couple weeks ago, I began thinking: Which of all the books I’ve read have deeply influenced me? Which books have actually changed my life?

I began writing them down in this post to share with you. I’ve added some commentary to explain why each book made the cut.

Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton

Have you ever been tempted to have an affair? Then this book will be like cold water on a blazing fire. I actually read it the first time when I was in high school; I wasn’t married yet. I read it again after I married. But the lessons I took from this book are a constant reminder to me.

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

This is most powerful book I’ve ever read about the issue of color and race in America. The “Invisible Man” in this book is the main character, but he has no name. People don’t see him; they see through him. It is a book about blindness and the ultimate removal of that blindness–the lifting of the veil.

All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren

A story of the rise and fall of a political icon. Not only does this novel illustrate the transient nature of power, it also paints a picture of regret and “what might have been.” Unless you’re reading with your eyes closed, this book should awaken you to grab hold of the pivotal moments that happen in your life.

The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

It is helpful to know this book was written specifically to expose what was happening in Chicago’s meat packing district at the beginning of the 20th Century. Sinclair was called a “muckraker,” which means he sought to expose “the powers that be” by speaking the truth. This book opened my eyes to the idea that the government is not as trustworthy as the school textbooks would have us believe.

Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo

Growing up, I wondered why so many old men were interested in the history of war. I now find the subject fascinating. I especially like war literature. This book was the first novel I’d ever read about war. It is exceptionally powerful. It tells the story of a man who has lost his arms and legs, as well as his ability to hear, see, or speak. He is, quite literally, a living stump. And so the book is a collection of his memories before the war, his thoughts about his post-war condition, and his efforts to communicate with the outside world.

Purple Cow by Seth Godin

Of all the marketing books I’ve read, this one had the most profound effect on me. It’s a simple message: be remarkable. Godin uses case studies to show how to be remarkable, and why it’s so important in today’s advertising-saturated world.

All in All by A.E. Knoch

This was the first book I had ever read that presented the idea that God would eventually restore all men to fellowship with Him. It was the first book I read that suggested “hell” didn’t exist. Definitely worth reading, although I feel there are better books on the subject (anything by Stephen Jones). You can also read “The Greatest Love Story Never Told,” which is a primer I wrote.

Secrets of Time by Stephen Jones

Have you ever wondered how old the earth is according to the Bible? Or have you ever wondered what kind of time cycles are revealed in the Scriptures? If so, you’ll want to read this book. It opened my eyes to the fact that time is not random. Rather, it is governed and controlled by God. Furthermore, Biblical time cycles help us to understand prophecy, especially what is happening in the world today.

The Heavenly Man by Brother Yun & Paul Hattaway

Never have I read a book (besides the Bible) that is so spiritually inspirational. Brother Yun is a Chinese man who spent many years sharing the love of Jesus in Communist China. We Christians in America have no idea what hardship is or what dying daily to ourselves really means. Brother Yun’s story is a testament to that. I believe all Christians should read this book.

The 80/20 Principle by Richard Koch

Koch’s book is based on a discovery made by Vilfredo Pareto, a discovery that says 20% of inputs create 80% of outputs; and 80% of inputs create only 20% of outputs. It seems rather simple on the surface, but seeing the 80/20 Principle at work in life and business is amazing. It’s a principle that can change your life if it is applied consistently to how you live and work.

Debt-Free Living by Larry Burkett

Over the years, I’ve accumulated a bit of debt. Much of it was justified by viewing the money I spent as “business investments.” This book helped me to see the debt I had accumulated was a result of greed and a desire to get rich quick. I can’t say this book was comfortable for me to read. But it definitely gave me a kick in the seat of the pants and made me finally do something about my debt.

The Bible

Last, but not least, the Bible has changed my life more than any other book ever written. I can’t even begin to say how it has changed me. I wouldn’t be able to trace its influence on me if I tried. It’s been a part of my life since I was born and will be a part of my life until I die.

On a side note, the first book of the Bible I ever read was Leviticus. I read it in 7th grade. Why? Because everybody said Leviticus was the worst book of the Bible. Naturally, given my contrarian nature, I knew I had to read Leviticus first.

So these are the 12 books that have changed my life.

Of course, I wish I could share more. I didn’t even get to mention Steinbeck, Faulkner, Rand, or any of the Russian authors, all of whom have impacted me in some way.

Now it’s your turn.

I want to know what books have changed your life.

If you’re up for it, write a blog post listing the books that have changed your life and why. Then link back to this blog post.

I will start a list at the bottom of this post linking to anybody who decides to participate. If you want to make sure you are included in the list, then please send me an email including the link to your post at rhealy [at] gmail [dot] com.

Thanks! And I look forward to reading your list.

-Ryan M. Healy

Links to Other Book Lists

About Ryan M. Healy

is a direct response copywriter. Since 2002, he has worked with scores of clients, including Agora Financial, Lombardi Publishing, and Contrarian Profits. He writes a popular blog about copywriting, advertising, and business growth, has been featured in publications like Feed Front magazine, and has been published on sites like WordStream.com, SmallBizClub.com, and MarketingForSuccess.com.


The Best Link Cloaker?
I've tried a number of link cloaking solutions through the years. None of them provided me with what I wanted. But thanks to Michel Fortin, I discovered a new link cloaking and link tracking service that I’ve fallen in love with!  Read My Review Here »

{ 44 comments }

Jennifer Gibbs March 25, 2008 at 10:54 am

Wow! I was so surprised to see Ethan Frome at the top of your list!

I went through a period a few years ago when I devoured all of the classics I never HAD to read in high school. This book really topped my list, and I’ve encountered so few others that have read it!

If I had to identify the Top 10 books in my life (and I read like you do…), I’d say:

1. The Bible – Not only for the spiritual truths that are found within, but also for the rich characters and real life scenarios that were reported on. My favorite is the Book of Joshua.

2. Value-Added Public Relations: The Secret Weapon of Integrated Marketing (by Thomas L. Harris). This book revolutionized the way I look at publicity and PR and has really broadened my horizons when dealing with new clients and customers in my writing business.

3. The Richest Man in Babylon – This book is a fantastic way to teach solid, long-lasting principles regarding your money and earnings. I like the allegorical approach, and the short, sweet and to the point style it was written in.

4. Using Your Brain for a Change (Dr. Richard Bandler) – This book was written by the “founder” of NLP, and offers great instruction on changing habits and the way you go about changing. Not only is the information priceless, the delivery is VERY funny and made me shoot coffee out of my nose and onto the screen…

5. Jump-Start Your Brain (Doug Hall) – Doug Hall is one of my modern business gurus. This guy is fantastic, and pretty much epitomizes thinking outside of the box. Any time I struggle with a new campaign or a new client, I turn to Doug Hall for help…

6. See You At the Top (Zig Ziglar) – This, as well as just about ANYTHING he’s come out with, is a great way to see yourself when you reach your full potential! I think my personal favorite is the list of qualities he recommends that you say to yourself, in front of a mirror, to affirm your greatness. At first, you feel silly (and a bit like a liar) but soon, you start to turn into that person you’re talking about.

7. Beautiful in God’s Eyes (Elizabeth George) Contrary to many women my age, I’ve always been in love with Proverbs 31. Since I got married (as a teenager) this book has really guided me in my journey to embodying the ideal of the Proverbs 31 woman.

8. The “First Man in Rome” Series (Colleen McCullough) I’d never really been into ancient Rome, until I picked up a paperback copy of The First Man in Rome at a Salvation Army. From then on out, I fell in love with Ancient Rome, and read all the way up to the life of Ceasar Augustus from Gaius Marius.

9. War & Peace – While anything BUT light reading, I picked up an old copy of this book right before heading on a cross-country train trip from Tacoma, WA to Cleveland, OH. I’d already read about 200 pages before I left, but exploring these characters as I headed across country for a depressing visit (the first anniversary of my nephew’s suicide) I realized that life definitely could be worse! Plus, it was nice to say I’d read it, and read it on purpose!

10. Finally, I’d have to say that – even though it wasn’t a pivotal kind of book – Piers Anthony’s Xanth novels changed my life. I was first introduced to him in the 7th grade, and was ushered into the world of an avid Sci-Fi fan. To date, I’ve read about everything he’s written, as well as the other greats in the genre – Terry Brooks, Mercedes Lackey… It opened my eyes to a whole new world and a great escape from reality!

Thanks for asking my two-cents!

Jennifer

Carolyn March 25, 2008 at 5:56 pm

Hey Ryan,

Congrats on your new blog …

and welcome to WordPress!

Ciao,

Carolyn

Carolyn March 25, 2008 at 10:56 am

Hey Ryan,

Congrats on your new blog …

and welcome to WordPress!

Ciao,

Carolyn

Richard March 25, 2008 at 6:14 pm

Hey Ryan,

The one book that had the most profound impact on me was “The Seven Valleys” by Baha’u’llah. It is very short, but intensly mystical. Read it with an open mind.

Richard March 25, 2008 at 11:14 am

Hey Ryan,

The one book that had the most profound impact on me was “The Seven Valleys” by Baha’u’llah. It is very short, but intensly mystical. Read it with an open mind.

Jim Sansi March 25, 2008 at 6:31 pm

Ryan— I did a list like this awhile back… although these are not all what I would consider life changing a few are… Here is the URL:

http://www.thekaizenbusiness.com/?p=149

-Jim

Jim Sansi March 25, 2008 at 11:31 am

Ryan— I did a list like this awhile back… although these are not all what I would consider life changing a few are… Here is the URL:

http://www.thekaizenbusiness.com/?p=149

-Jim

Kevin Dawson March 25, 2008 at 6:59 pm

Hey Ryan,

1. The Bible
2. Creation’s Jubilee
3. Atlas Shrugged
4. Human Action

Glad to see we’re on the same wavelength!

Kevin Dawson March 25, 2008 at 11:59 am

Hey Ryan,

1. The Bible
2. Creation’s Jubilee
3. Atlas Shrugged
4. Human Action

Glad to see we’re on the same wavelength!

Ryan M. Healy March 25, 2008 at 7:13 pm

Jennifer – Ethan Frome isn’t exactly a popular book. That’s cool that you enjoyed it as much as I did! War and Peace is on my list… haven’t gotten to that one yet.

Richard – Thanks for the suggestion.

Jim – Nice list. The 4-Hour Workweek is excellent.

Michael Roach March 25, 2008 at 7:13 pm

Thanks for the list and reviews, Ryan.

I just finished reading the best book I’ve read so far — ‘Getting Things Done’ — or GTD — by David Allen. I’m going to be GTDing my home office (and my life) starting this coming Friday. I’m excited to get started!

Ryan M. Healy March 25, 2008 at 12:13 pm

Jennifer – Ethan Frome isn’t exactly a popular book. That’s cool that you enjoyed it as much as I did! War and Peace is on my list… haven’t gotten to that one yet.

Richard – Thanks for the suggestion.

Jim – Nice list. The 4-Hour Workweek is excellent.

Michael Roach March 25, 2008 at 12:13 pm

Thanks for the list and reviews, Ryan.

I just finished reading the best book I’ve read so far — ‘Getting Things Done’ — or GTD — by David Allen. I’m going to be GTDing my home office (and my life) starting this coming Friday. I’m excited to get started!

Ryan M. Healy March 25, 2008 at 7:24 pm

Kevin – Nice list. The only one on your list I haven’t read is Human Action. Who is it by?

Michael – You’re welcome. I’ve not read Getting Things Done… yet. I hear it’s great though.

Ryan M. Healy March 25, 2008 at 12:24 pm

Kevin – Nice list. The only one on your list I haven’t read is Human Action. Who is it by?

Michael – You’re welcome. I’ve not read Getting Things Done… yet. I hear it’s great though.

Jennifer Gibbs March 25, 2008 at 5:54 pm

Wow! I was so surprised to see Ethan Frome at the top of your list!

I went through a period a few years ago when I devoured all of the classics I never HAD to read in high school. This book really topped my list, and I’ve encountered so few others that have read it!

If I had to identify the Top 10 books in my life (and I read like you do…), I’d say:

1. The Bible – Not only for the spiritual truths that are found within, but also for the rich characters and real life scenarios that were reported on. My favorite is the Book of Joshua.

2. Value-Added Public Relations: The Secret Weapon of Integrated Marketing (by Thomas L. Harris). This book revolutionized the way I look at publicity and PR and has really broadened my horizons when dealing with new clients and customers in my writing business.

3. The Richest Man in Babylon – This book is a fantastic way to teach solid, long-lasting principles regarding your money and earnings. I like the allegorical approach, and the short, sweet and to the point style it was written in.

4. Using Your Brain for a Change (Dr. Richard Bandler) – This book was written by the “founder” of NLP, and offers great instruction on changing habits and the way you go about changing. Not only is the information priceless, the delivery is VERY funny and made me shoot coffee out of my nose and onto the screen…

5. Jump-Start Your Brain (Doug Hall) – Doug Hall is one of my modern business gurus. This guy is fantastic, and pretty much epitomizes thinking outside of the box. Any time I struggle with a new campaign or a new client, I turn to Doug Hall for help…

6. See You At the Top (Zig Ziglar) – This, as well as just about ANYTHING he’s come out with, is a great way to see yourself when you reach your full potential! I think my personal favorite is the list of qualities he recommends that you say to yourself, in front of a mirror, to affirm your greatness. At first, you feel silly (and a bit like a liar) but soon, you start to turn into that person you’re talking about.

7. Beautiful in God’s Eyes (Elizabeth George) Contrary to many women my age, I’ve always been in love with Proverbs 31. Since I got married (as a teenager) this book has really guided me in my journey to embodying the ideal of the Proverbs 31 woman.

8. The “First Man in Rome” Series (Colleen McCullough) I’d never really been into ancient Rome, until I picked up a paperback copy of The First Man in Rome at a Salvation Army. From then on out, I fell in love with Ancient Rome, and read all the way up to the life of Ceasar Augustus from Gaius Marius.

9. War & Peace – While anything BUT light reading, I picked up an old copy of this book right before heading on a cross-country train trip from Tacoma, WA to Cleveland, OH. I’d already read about 200 pages before I left, but exploring these characters as I headed across country for a depressing visit (the first anniversary of my nephew’s suicide) I realized that life definitely could be worse! Plus, it was nice to say I’d read it, and read it on purpose!

10. Finally, I’d have to say that – even though it wasn’t a pivotal kind of book – Piers Anthony’s Xanth novels changed my life. I was first introduced to him in the 7th grade, and was ushered into the world of an avid Sci-Fi fan. To date, I’ve read about everything he’s written, as well as the other greats in the genre – Terry Brooks, Mercedes Lackey… It opened my eyes to a whole new world and a great escape from reality!

Thanks for asking my two-cents!

Jennifer

Louis March 26, 2008 at 7:53 pm

I picked up Human Action once and tried to start reading it. It’s a nearly 1000 page mammoth. I admire anyone who has gotten through it.

Human Action is Ludwig von Mises’ opus work. Mises is considered to be the father of the Austrian School of economics. It’s about the economics of liberty as opposed to the economics of government efficiency which is what’s usually taught as economics.

Without Mises, there probably wouldn’t be a libertarian movement. The Mises Institute has published a couple of Ron Paul’s books.

You can download the pdf version of Human Action at: http://www.mises.org/resources/3250

Louis March 26, 2008 at 12:53 pm

I picked up Human Action once and tried to start reading it. It’s a nearly 1000 page mammoth. I admire anyone who has gotten through it.

Human Action is Ludwig von Mises’ opus work. Mises is considered to be the father of the Austrian School of economics. It’s about the economics of liberty as opposed to the economics of government efficiency which is what’s usually taught as economics.

Without Mises, there probably wouldn’t be a libertarian movement. The Mises Institute has published a couple of Ron Paul’s books.

You can download the pdf version of Human Action at: http://www.mises.org/resources/3250

chad March 27, 2008 at 7:30 am

Hey Ryan, I just created my list. Thanks for the great post!

chad March 27, 2008 at 12:30 am

Hey Ryan, I just created my list. Thanks for the great post!

Kevin Dawson March 27, 2008 at 3:34 pm

Human Action by Ludwig von Mises — Ron Paul’s Mentor. Lengthy but readable, and a complete understanding of economics. Really lets you “get” what’s going on in the world.

Kevin Dawson March 27, 2008 at 8:34 am

Human Action by Ludwig von Mises — Ron Paul’s Mentor. Lengthy but readable, and a complete understanding of economics. Really lets you “get” what’s going on in the world.

Ryan M. Healy March 27, 2008 at 3:58 pm

Louis and Kevin – Thanks for the info about Human Action. I’ve read some of Mises’ writings. I know Bill Bonner references him quite a bit.

Chad – Thanks for participating! Your link is up.

Ryan M. Healy March 27, 2008 at 8:58 am

Louis and Kevin – Thanks for the info about Human Action. I’ve read some of Mises’ writings. I know Bill Bonner references him quite a bit.

Chad – Thanks for participating! Your link is up.

Mike Johnson March 28, 2008 at 2:02 am

Ryan-
I’ll de-lurk to add a few:
+The Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. This is an absolute masterpiece of the absurd. I’m smiling all over just thinking about it.

+A Feast of Snakes by Harry Crews. I saw this guy speak, and he’s every bit as rough around the edges as his fiction implies.

+Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins. I love the weaving of story lines, really all of his books are great.

+Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B. Cialdini. This was recently recommended to me and it’s become heavily highlighted and dog-eared.

+Jeffrey Gitomer’s Little Red Book of Selling by Jeffrey Gitomer. I appreciate the brusqueness of his perspective. And I generally agree that no matter your profession you’re a salesperson to a certain extent.

+Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. I know this falls into two camps- love or hate. I love it…

Mike Johnson March 27, 2008 at 7:02 pm

Ryan-
I’ll de-lurk to add a few:
+The Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole. This is an absolute masterpiece of the absurd. I’m smiling all over just thinking about it.

+A Feast of Snakes by Harry Crews. I saw this guy speak, and he’s every bit as rough around the edges as his fiction implies.

+Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins. I love the weaving of story lines, really all of his books are great.

+Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B. Cialdini. This was recently recommended to me and it’s become heavily highlighted and dog-eared.

+Jeffrey Gitomer’s Little Red Book of Selling by Jeffrey Gitomer. I appreciate the brusqueness of his perspective. And I generally agree that no matter your profession you’re a salesperson to a certain extent.

+Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki. I know this falls into two camps- love or hate. I love it…

Ryan M. Healy March 28, 2008 at 12:32 pm

Mike – Thanks for jumping into the dialog.

Your description of A Confederacy of Dunces reminds me of Catch-22. I laughed out loud reading that book. Toole’s book has been on my “to-read” list for quite a while.

I have a copy of Influence, but I haven’t read that yet either (hanging my head in shame).

Thanks again for commenting, Mike!

Ryan M. Healy March 28, 2008 at 5:32 am

Mike – Thanks for jumping into the dialog.

Your description of A Confederacy of Dunces reminds me of Catch-22. I laughed out loud reading that book. Toole’s book has been on my “to-read” list for quite a while.

I have a copy of Influence, but I haven’t read that yet either (hanging my head in shame).

Thanks again for commenting, Mike!

danielle March 30, 2008 at 6:00 pm

Hello there. I did this. It’s on my blog entitled “12 books that changed my life”. Thanks for the idea.

danielle March 31, 2008 at 1:00 am

Hello there. I did this. It’s on my blog entitled “12 books that changed my life”. Thanks for the idea.

Charlotte April 8, 2008 at 7:23 pm

only 12….?
Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Little Women (et al) by Louisa Alcott
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Grandmother of Time by Z. Budapest
The Spiral Dance by Starwalker
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The Internet Business Books 1 & 2 by James Brausch
1984 by George Orwell
The Joy of Cooking by Rombauer and Becker
Thud by Terry Pratchett
Teaching as a Subversive activity by Postman & Weingartner

Charlotte April 8, 2008 at 12:23 pm

only 12….?
Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Little Women (et al) by Louisa Alcott
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Grandmother of Time by Z. Budapest
The Spiral Dance by Starwalker
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The Internet Business Books 1 & 2 by James Brausch
1984 by George Orwell
The Joy of Cooking by Rombauer and Becker
Thud by Terry Pratchett
Teaching as a Subversive activity by Postman & Weingartner

Wade Balsdon April 10, 2008 at 5:04 am

Thanks Ryan, I have emailed you my link. Great idea and hopefully we all can learn from these books.

Wade Balsdon April 10, 2008 at 12:04 pm

Thanks Ryan, I have emailed you my link. Great idea and hopefully we all can learn from these books.

John C. A. Manley May 2, 2009 at 4:49 pm

I’ve never read any of these books (except the Bible, of course) but I think I will be soon. We haven’t bought a new book in well over a year, because we said we’d read all we had. Well, we realized the other day, the stack is getting pretty low. Really appreciate you putting this together. I’ll try to see if I can do the same.

John C. A. Manley May 2, 2009 at 9:49 am

I’ve never read any of these books (except the Bible, of course) but I think I will be soon. We haven’t bought a new book in well over a year, because we said we’d read all we had. Well, we realized the other day, the stack is getting pretty low. Really appreciate you putting this together. I’ll try to see if I can do the same.

Ryan M. Healy May 4, 2009 at 3:09 pm

@John – Glad you found the list helpful. If you read any of the books in my list, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised. And if you put together a list of your own, let me know and I’ll link back to you.

Ryan

Ryan M. Healy May 4, 2009 at 8:09 am

@John – Glad you found the list helpful. If you read any of the books in my list, I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised. And if you put together a list of your own, let me know and I’ll link back to you.

Ryan

Kevin Cullis June 4, 2009 at 5:41 am
Kevin Cullis June 3, 2009 at 10:41 pm
Julie June 23, 2009 at 11:39 am

When you say you read the “bible”, what do you mean? I am guessing you mean the New Testament. But aren’t there a few versions of that? King James and such? Which one did you read?

I read an excerpt from the bible that was in another book, and it was really, really moving and poetic. Later, I looked up that passage in a bible in a bookstore, and it was quite different from what I had read. (and not as good either).

Julie June 23, 2009 at 4:39 am

When you say you read the “bible”, what do you mean? I am guessing you mean the New Testament. But aren’t there a few versions of that? King James and such? Which one did you read?

I read an excerpt from the bible that was in another book, and it was really, really moving and poetic. Later, I looked up that passage in a bible in a bookstore, and it was quite different from what I had read. (and not as good either).

Ryan M. Healy June 23, 2009 at 2:23 pm

@Julie – I read all of the Bible, both Old and New Testaments. As far as translation goes, I’m more interested in accuracy than readability. So I prefer the New American Standard Version.

But it’s not always correct, so I also cross-check it with King James, Young’s Literal, and the Concordant Literal translations.

I always avoid “modern” translations like The Living Bible, The Message, and anything by Eugene Peterson (author of The Message). They may be easier to read for some people, but they completely change the meaning of the original scriptures.

By the way, for cross-checking passages, I usually use http://www.bible.com — otherwise I just read from the New American Standard or New International versions that I have.

Ryan

Ryan M. Healy June 23, 2009 at 7:23 am

@Julie – I read all of the Bible, both Old and New Testaments. As far as translation goes, I’m more interested in accuracy than readability. So I prefer the New American Standard Version.

But it’s not always correct, so I also cross-check it with King James, Young’s Literal, and the Concordant Literal translations.

I always avoid “modern” translations like The Living Bible, The Message, and anything by Eugene Peterson (author of The Message). They may be easier to read for some people, but they completely change the meaning of the original scriptures.

By the way, for cross-checking passages, I usually use http://www.bible.com — otherwise I just read from the New American Standard or New International versions that I have.

Ryan

Comments on this entry are closed.

{ 8 trackbacks }

Previous post:

Next post: