Copywriting Headquarters Abandons the Home Office

After 7 years of working from home, I finally decided to get an office.

Signed a one-year lease a couple weeks ago and moved into the office on Tuesday of this week.

It’s only 6 minutes from my house, so it’s about as convenient as it could possibly be.

So why did I get an office? And why now?

Firstly, I realized that the number of distractions and interruptions at home had become insurmountable.

It wasn’t just the overt interruptions — like a child walking into my office to ask me if he can have a snack.

It was also the dozens of “covert” interruptions.

For example, hearing one of my kids crying loudly outside. Am I going to just listen to my kid cry, knowing that he’s hurt, and keep typing away as if nothing were wrong?

Fuggedaboutit.

Or how about this…

One day I saw my 4-year-old son walk into my neighbor’s side yard (directly outside my home office window), drop his pants, and start urinating.

I couldn’t just ignore that, so I opened my office window and had my son come inside for a good talking-to.

It’s that kind of stuff.

Plus, with the arrival of my fourth child, I knew the noise level at home was about to go up yet another notch — and that I would be sucked into even more domestic duties.

Right before I signed the lease for the office, I posed this question on Facebook:

I can get an office close to home for $450/mo. Good idea? Bad idea? Your thoughts please.

Probably the most insightful response was from fellow copywriter Cory Fossum. He wrote:

Do it. I pay a little less than that for my office each month and I’m rarely there anymore (the big iMac is here at home) but I won’t get rid of it for several reasons. When I’m writing (as opposed to video editing) it’s a nice retreat and a welcome environment out of the home. A great change of scenery in an amazing locale. It’s super nice to get out of the house – in your case, for a little peace and quiet, I presume. But perhaps the most important reason is that it lends a ridiculous amount of credibility to your business to be able to say “my office” and not mean your house. Clients are impressed when they visit. And so are your 9-5 friends and prospects. It looks great on billing statements and communications. And it does wonders for your business mindset.

Rather than provide any direct advice, Mark Joyner simply asked two questions:

Will you be $450 worth of “more productive?” Will it add any intangible value to your life or your family’s?

I believe the answer to both of those questions is an unequivocal YES.

Anyway, here I am, in a 150-square-foot office that is so quiet it’s foreign.

But it’s great for getting stuff done.

I can actually start writing something and know that I can keep writing until I’m finished.

It’s a good feeling.

By the way… if you haven’t become a Copywriting Code member yet, you should. I’ll have more good stuff coming soon.

http://clickora.com/CopywritingCode

-Ryan M. Healy

Ryan M. Healy

Ryan Healy is a financial copywriter and the author of Speed Writing for Nonfiction Writers. Since 2002, he has worked with scores of clients, including Agora Financial, Lombardi Publishing, and Contrarian Profits. He writes a popular blog about copywriting, advertising, and business growth, has been featured in publications like Feed Front magazine, and has been published on sites like WordStream.com, SmallBizClub.com, and MarketingForSuccess.com.